Colorado State Approval For Greenway University To Teach Medical Marijuana

The industry’s leading medical marijuana educational provider, Greenway University, has received full format state approval from the Colorado Department of Higher Education.

This marks yet another industry milestone by moving from probationary status to full status as a recognized Colorado vocational school and the University has also received authorization for teaching medical marijuana state approved courses. The authorization makes it the first and only such state approved and regulated medical marijuana courses in the United States.

“We are extremely thankful to the state of Colorado for allowing us to become a part of history for the entire medical marijuana industry. This monumental decision further validates our forward thinking messages of education, professionalism and industry leading programs,” Greenway University founder and CEO Gus Escamilla, said. “We feel incredibly blessed and thankful to the state of Colorado for providing us with this monumental decision and approving us for an additional 10 state approved and regulated medical marijuana education courses that range from Budtender™, medicine making, tinctures, concentrates, continuing legal education to advanced cultivation courses that set the standard for a higher level of professional education for the entire medical marijuana industry.”

Escamilla added, “This marks yet another historic milestone for our industry. We recently announced our second campus development plans into the Arizona marketplace with passing of Proposition 203 with further expansion plans across the US with the continued legalization of the medical marijuana industry. We are exceptionally excited about the Arizona marketplace. Our first weekend course was such an incredible success with over 300 students in attendance that we immediately scheduled a second seminar for February 26th and 27th, 2011 in Scottsdale, Arizona to meet the growing demand.”

Reference:
Greenway University

CMA Wants To Legalize And Regulate Marijuana

The California Medical Association (CMA) that includes 35,000 doctors has adopted an official policy that recommends the legalization and regulation of cannabis. The CMA adopted the new stance at its annual meeting recently in Anaheim.

The board of trustees of the largest physician group in California adopted the policy unanimously at its meeting in Sacramento, according to a statement on the CMA website.
California is one of the sixteen states where medical marijuana is legal, making it possible for doctors to recommend the drug to their patients.

Dr. James Hay, the president-elect of CMA, said that present-day laws put doctors in an uncomfortable position. “California decriminalized its medical use, yet if a physician recommends it to a patient we are violating federal law.” Hay said.

According to a statement put out by CMA, marijuana is a Schedule 1 drug that means that study and research of the drug is limited. “Think it ought to be regulated, better controlled, no control over what’s in marijuana. If we don’t know what’s in it, we can’t do any kind of scientific evaluation,” Hay said.

Dr. Donald Lyman, the Sacramento physician who wrote new policy of the group, attributed the shift to growing frustration over California’s medical marijuana law, which permits cannabis use with a doctor’s recommendation.

“It’s an uncomfortable position for doctors,” he said. “It is an open question whether cannabis is useful or not. That question can only be answered once it is legalized and more research is done. Then, and only then, can we know what it is useful for.”
The California Police Chiefs Association opposes the new policy of the CMA. “Drug use is a health issue and for too long we have let law enforcement and federal bureaucrats decide policy. CMA is saying let’s treat medical marijuana as a health issue,” Bill Piper, the director of national affairs for the Drug Policy Alliance said.

Dr. Igor Grant, head of the Center for Medicinal Cannabis at UC San Diego, defended therapeutic use of the drug. “There’s good evidence that it has medicinal value,” he said. “Can you say it’s 100% bulletproof? No. But the research we’ve done at the center shows it’s helpful with certain types of pain.”

Reference:
California Medical Association

Multiple Medical Marijuana Reform Measures Introduced By Congress

A bi-partisan coalition of United States House lawmakers has introduced multiple measures in Congress for reforming federal marijuana laws.

The House Bill 1983, The Medical Marijuana Patient Protection Act ensures that medical cannabis patients, caregivers, or third-party providers in states that have approved its use will no longer have to fear arrest or prosecution from federal law enforcement agencies. It states, “No provision of the Controlled Substances Act shall prohibit or otherwise restrict in a State in which marijuana may be prescribed or recommended by a physician for medical use under applicable State law.”

Says the bill’s primary sponsor, Rep Barney Frank (D-MA): “The time has come for the federal government to stop preempting states’ medical marijuana laws. For the federal government to come in and supersede state law is a real mistake for those in pain for whom nothing else seems to work. This bill would block the federal prosecution of those patients who reside in those states that allow medical marijuana.”

State-authorized medical marijuana businesses have full access to banking services by amending the federal Bank Secrecy Act, as per the House Bill 1984, The Small Business Banking Improvement Act of 2011. The measure is sponsored by Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO), who states: “When a small business, such as a medical marijuana dispensary, can’t access basic banking services they either have to become cash-only — and become targets of crime — or they’ll end up out-of-business. In states that have legalized medical marijuana, and for businesses that have been state-approved, it is simply wrong for the federal government to intrude and threaten banks that are involved in legal transactions.”

The Internal Revenue Code of 1986 has been amended to allow a deduction for expenses in connection with the trade or business of selling medical cannabis pursuant to state law under the House Bill 1985, The Small Business Tax Equity Act of 2011. The bill’s lead sponsor, Rep. Pete Stark (D-CA) said, “Our tax code undercuts legal medical marijuana dispensaries by preventing them from taking all the deductions allowed for other small businesses. While unfair to these small business owners, the tax code also punishes the patients who rely on them for safe and reliable access to medical marijuana prescribed by a doctor. The Small Business Tax Equity Act would correct these shortcomings.”

New Jersey About To Let Medical Marijuana Facilities Open

On 21st November, 2011, New Jersey moved a bit closer to allow medical marijuana facilities open. However, it made it clear that this is unlikely to happen in the first few months of the year 2012.

Forms that would be required by alternative treatment centers to get permits to start doing business were posted by the state Health and Senior Services Department. Earlier this year, New Jersey selected six non-profit groups for growing and selling pot to qualifying patients under a law adopted in January 2010. But, the state is yet to finalize regulations for the program.

Greenleaf Compassion Center, one of the prospective pot-providers, says it has already lined up locations and awaiting state approval. The center also said that it would take about four months to grow a crop before it could begin selling to patients from a storefront in Montclair.

The forms ask the organizations for background checks on employees and for local zoning approval documentation, among other things. The state may take 60 days for issuing permits after receiving completed forms, under the law.

Health Department spokeswoman Donna Leusner said the reviews would be “completed expeditiously to ensure the integrity of the program and to make medicinal marijuana available to patients as soon as possible.”

16 states to legalize Medical Marijuana

The usefulness of medical marijuana for treating health complications has been realized by 16 states in the United States of America and DC that have enacted laws for legalizing medical marijuana. It is important to note that fourteen out of the sixteen states need residency proof before application from a qualifying patient can be considered for the use of medical marijuana. Oregon is the only state in the United States that accepts out-of-state applications while Delaware has not revealed till now whether it will be accepting applications from non-state residents or not.

1.    Alaska: Medical marijuana can be availed for the treatment of health complications such as cancer, chronic pain, epilepsy and other disorders characterized by seizures, Cachexia, glaucoma, HIV or AIDS, multiple sclerosis and other disorders featured by nausea and muscle spasticity while the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes may be approved by the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services for other health conditions. It has removed state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession, and cultivation of marijuana by patients having a written physician documentation that they may benefit from medicinal marijuana use.

2.    Arizona: The state allows patients having a written physician documentation that they may benefit from medicinal marijuana use and health conditions that are approved for use of medical marijuana are ALS, Crohn’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C, cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe and chronic pain, severe nausea, severe or persistent muscle spasms (including multiple sclerosis), and seizures (including epilepsy).

3.    California: The state has removed state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession, and cultivation of marijuana by patients having a written or oral physician recommendation that they may benefit from medicinal marijuana use. The health conditions for which marijuana is approved are anorexia, arthritis, cachexia, cancer, chronic pain, glaucoma, migraine, persistent muscle spasms, AIDS, severe nausea, and other chronic or persistent medical symptoms.

4.    Colorado: The state allows patients having a written physician documentation that they may benefit from medicinal marijuana use and health conditions that are approved for use of medical marijuana are glaucoma, HIV/AIDS positive, cachexia, severe pain, severe nausea, seizures, cancer, and other conditions are subject to approval by the Colorado Board of Health.

5.    District of Columbia (DC): The approved health conditions for use of medicinal marijuana are HIV, AIDS, glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, cancer, and other chronic, long-lasting, or debilitating conditions that interfere with the basic functions of life or conditions for which marijuana may be beneficial such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

6.    Delaware: A patient can buy or posses marijuana in Delaware only if he or she has a written physician documentation that he or she may benefit from medicinal marijuana use and suffering from a specified debilitating medical condition (cancer, HIV/AIDS, decompensated cirrhosis, ALS, Alzheimer’s disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, or a condition producing wasting syndrome, or severe debilitating pain that has not responded to other treatments for more than three months, or if other forms of treatment have produced serious side effects) but a patient or caregiver cannot grow marijuana at home.

7.    Hawaii: The state has removed state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession, and cultivation of marijuana by patients having a written physician recommendation that potential benefits of medicinal marijuana use would likely outweigh the health risks and the patient is suffering from a debilitating condition. The approved medical conditions are Cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition that may lead to cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe pain, severe nausea, seizures, and other conditions that may be subjected to the approval by the Hawaii Department of Health.

8.    Maine: The state has removed state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession, and cultivation of marijuana by patients having a written or oral physician recommendation that they may benefit from medicinal marijuana use and the approved health conditions for which medicinal marijuana may be used are glaucoma; multiple sclerosis, other disorders characterized by muscle spasticity, epilepsy and other disorders characterized by seizures, and nausea or vomiting due to AIDS or cancer chemotherapy.

9.    Michigan: Medicinal marijuana is legal for the treatment of health conditions, including cancer, glaucoma, HIV, AIDS, hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, nail patella, cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe and chronic pain, Crohn’s disease, agitation of Alzheimer’s disease, severe and chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures, epilepsy, muscle spasms, and multiple sclerosis.

10.    Montana: The state has legalized medical marijuana for the treatment of cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, or a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or its treatment producing cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe or chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures, or any other medical condition or treatment for a medical condition adopted by the department by rule.

11.    Nevada: The state has removed state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession, and cultivation of marijuana by patients having a written physician recommendation that they may benefit from medicinal marijuana use and the approved health conditions are AIDS, glaucoma, cancer, or any medical condition or treatment to a medical condition producing cachexia, persistent muscle spasms or seizures, severe nausea or pain, or any other condition that may be subjected to approval by the health division of the state Department of Human Resources.

12.    New Jersey: The state has legalized medical marijuana for the treatment of seizure disorder, including epilepsy, intractable skeletal muscular spasticity, severe nausea or vomiting, cachexia, or wasting syndrome resulting from HIV/AIDS or cancer, severe or chronic pain, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease), multiple sclerosis, terminal cancer, muscular dystrophy, or inflammatory bowel disease, or terminal illness.

13.    New Mexico: The state has removed state-level criminal penalties on the use and possession of marijuana for conditions, including severe chronic pain, painful peripheral neuropathy, intractable nausea/vomiting, severe anorexia/cachexia, Crohn’s disease, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease), cancer, glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, hepatitis C infection, damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord with intractable spasticity, epilepsy, HIV/AIDS, and hospice patients.

14.    Oregon: The state has removed state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession, and cultivation of marijuana by patients having a written physician recommendation that they may benefit from medicinal marijuana use when it comes to mitigating of debilitating symptoms. The approved conditions are cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, or a medical condition producing cachexia, severe pain, severe nausea, seizures, or other conditions are subject to approval by the Health Division of the Oregon Department of Human Resources.

15.    Rhode Island: The approved conditions for use of medicinal marijuana in the state are cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C, or treatment of a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or its treatment producing cachexia or wasting syndrome, or any other medical condition or its treatment approved by the state Department of Health.

16.    Vermont: The approved conditions for use of medicinal marijuana in the state are cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C, or treatment of a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or its treatment producing cachexia or wasting syndrome or severe pain or nausea or seizures.

Washington: The state has removed state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession, and cultivation of marijuana by patients having a written physician recommendation that potential benefits of medicinal marijuana use would likely outweigh the health risks and the patient is suffering from a debilitating condition. The approved health conditions are Cachexia, cancer, HIV or AIDS, glaucoma, epilepsy, intractable pain, multiple sclerosis, or other conditions that are subjected to approval by the Washington Board of Health.

Teacher in Scottsdale, AZ will teach students to grow Marijuana

A Scottsdale school is all set to start teaching students how to grow medical marijuana for treating chronic health conditions.

The Papago Plaza shopping center at Scottsdale and McDowell roads has been opened by the Green Horizons University, next to the Red Kimichi Korean Restaurant, Holy Hill Acupuncture, and the Flower Cart.

Dan Halbert, the school director, remarked that there was a requirement for education in terms of medical marijuana before dispensaries and cultivation centers open across Arizona. “Stoners, the young men who really love the plant, can be trained to work at a dispensary, to learn the effects of the plant, or at a hydroponic growing center,” Halbert said.

Halbert operates two medical marijuana dispensaries: the RainForest Collective near Venice Beach in Los Angeles and Sons of Beaches in San Diego.

A large number of marijuana cultivation schools are already operating in other medical marijuana states, including Cannabis Training University, the so-called Harvard of medical marijuana colleges, Oaksterdam University, and Hempgard University.

The courses of Greenway would include the history of hemp, cannabis therapeutics, and budtending 101 and all the offered courses have been approved by the Colorado Board of Occupational Schools. Green Horizons would also be selling growing equipment for medical marijuana cultivation and providing legal, medical, and auditing consultation to dispensary operators.

Restrictions On Marijuana Research

Despite the fact that many studies in the past have demonstrated the usefulness of marijuana, outdated regulations and attitudes have thwarted legitimate marijuana research. This is evident from the fact that even though marijuana’s usefulness can be gauged from the fact that it has been made legal in many states of the United States of America, there are many states that still term it as a Schedule 1 drug, alongside LSD and heroin.

The worst part is that marijuana has been defined as having no medical use and potentially additive in nature even though medical studies have proven that medical marijuana is one of the best drugs for treating health complications such as arthritis, neuropathic pain, nausea, spasticity, glaucoma, movement disorders, malignant tumors, HIV, the AIDS wasting syndrome, or dementia. Medical marijuana is also second to none when it comes to providing relief to patients suffering from health diseases, including hepatitis C, incontinence, multiple sclerosis, osteoporosis, chronic pain, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes mellitus, fibromyalgia, Huntington’s disease, and Tourette’s syndrome.

If that was not all, the marijuana provided by he National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is regarded as less potent when compared to the marijuana often easily available on the street. Furthermore, studies that emphasize on finding the positive benefits of marijuana smoking are not easily funded, while those highlighting negative effects of marijuana get easy funds.

Research Facility Opens In Clio, Focusing On Medical Marijuana

A health and wellness center was formally opened in Clio that would the home of a marijuana research institute keen to change the negative stigma associated with marijuana.

Eric Gunnels, the Co-Founder of All Natural Health & Wellness Center, said marijuana is a drug that has been vastly misunderstood and it has no additive properties. Gunnels further remarked that there has been no recorded death with the use of marijuana in the history of mankind.

All Natural Health and Wellness Center, the first patient care facility in Michigan to allow use of marijuana for gathering drug research, will be emphasizing on educating the general public about the medicinal benefits of marijuana through its non-profit Cannabis Research Institute. Rob Lapeen, the Co-Founder of All Natural Health & Wellness Center, said the center will help public find different ways to use their medicines and get a doctor’s appointment for new patient approval.

The center is expected to bring an end to the marijuana black market and will be providing protection dog training for medical marijuana care-givers who want to guard their homes.

FDA Blocks Marijuana Research For Veterans

A pilot study aimed at examining the benefits of marijuana for veterans with treatment-resistant post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been blocked by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

The study would have been conducted by Dr. Sue Sisley of the University of Arizona at Phoenix and was sponsored by the non-profit research organization, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS).

In a statement, MAPS said hundreds of veterans in states (that have legalized medical marijuana) have reported benefits of using marijuana for controlling their post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. The large numbers of treatment-resistant veterans and growing number of service members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with combat-related trauma indicate the pressing need for research into additional treatments for PTSD.

The request of researchers to obtain licenses to grow marijuana was denied by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) that claimed that the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) can be the only one to supply marijuana for Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-regulated research.

Medical Marijuana Discouraged By Researchers In Studies

The U.S. federal government is still finding new ways to deter popularity and usefulness of medical marijuana despite the fact that the Obama administration has offered tacit support and giving hints and doing things to promote liberal medical marijuana laws. However, the Federal government is ignoring and delaying the legalizing process to make marijuana available for research.

This can be evident from the fact Lyle E. Craker, a professor of plant sciences at the University of Massachusetts, applied nearly nine years ago to get permission from federal authorities and the Drug Enforcement Administration has refused permission. The worst part is that this was after the agency’s own administrative law judge ruled in 2007 that the application of Dr. Cracker should be approved.

The fact that the federal government is trying every way is also evident from the comments made by a spokesman for National Institute on Drug Abuse. Shirley Simson said, “As the National Institute on Drug Abuse, our focus is primarily on the negative consequences of marijuana use,” and added, “We generally do not fund research focused on the potential beneficial medical effects of marijuana.

It is worth noting that marijuana is the only major drug for which the federal government controls the only legal research supply, for which the government needs a special scientific review.

Studies in the last few decades, especially the last few years, have shown that marijuana may improve appetite and relieve nausea among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The drug also has the potential to alleviate the numbness and aching that are experienced by HIV and AIDS patients. Dr. Igor Grant, director of the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research at the University of California, San Diego recently said that there are strong hints that the drug can ameliorate some of the neurological problems associated with degenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis.